Walgreens Coupon Policy + RRs explained!

Print their coupon policy here.

 

Here are the highlights:

  • They will accept 1 store and 1 manufacturer coupon per item.
  • There is no overage.  Coupon values will be lowered accordingly.
  • You cannot have more coupons than items.  See note on “fillers” below.
  • On BOGO promos, you can use 1 Manufacturer coupon per item, but the net price cannot go below zero.

 

Register Rewards:

  • You can only get 1 RR on a product in a transaction.  Ex:  There is a $1 RR WYB a tube of Crest toothpaste.  If you buy 2 tubes, you will only get 1 RR.
  • You cannot use a RR for a product (or family of products like P&G) to get the same product and still generate another RR on that product.  Ex:  If you use your $1 RR from Crest towards another tube of Crest, a RR will not print a second time.
  • Usually expire within 14 days.
  • Print out as a coupon at the register.  Currently not loaded to your card.
  • Cannot be used toward prescriptions and several other restrictions specified on the coupon.

 

Balance Rewards:

  • You can join in the store or here.  It is free to join.
  • You accrue 10 points for every $1 spent.   Some items give you bonus points when you purchase them, allowing you to accrue at a faster rate.
  • Some states will allow you to accrue when you fill a prescription (see details on their website).
  • Once you reach 5000 points, you can get $5 in Walgreens Rewards.   Below is the breakdown:
Points earned Reward
5,000 $5
10,000 $10
18,000 $20
30,000 $35
40,000 $50
  • Rewards are loaded onto your card, and will not be used until you are ready.
  • If you use BR to pay for a purchase, you will not accrue BR on that purchase.

 

Some helpful tips for shopping Walgreens:

  • “Fillers”:  If you have more coupons than items, you will need a “filler”.  A filler is any item that balances out your ratio.  Great fillers are those little $0.25 candies in the checkout lane, something from the clearance endcap (I always check the endcap when I go!), or anything else cheap you find.  I try to get things I would use anyway, and are $0.99 or less.  This keeps my OOP cost low and fulfills their requirement.  If you forget, the last coupon won’t scan and the cashier will usually remind you!
  • “Rolling RRs”:  Remember that pesky rule about not being able to use a RR to get the same RR?  Well “rolling” is a way to get things you want and pay as little as possible OOP.  You find 2 or 3 RR deals you like, and alternate back and forth.  This works best if the RRs are close in value.  Here is an example of how I recently rolled RRs to get cheap items:

There were 2 deals of interest to me.  Melatonin on sale for $4, with a $4 RR, making it free.  And pain relief cream, on  sale     for $7, with a $7 RR, making it also free.

Transaction #1:  Melatonin  $4.  Spent $4 OOP, got a $4 RR

Transaction #2:  Pain relief cream $7.  Used $4 RR from transaction #1, and paid $3 OOP.  Received a $7 RR.

Transaction #3:  Melatonin $4, and a digestive aid $3.98.  Used $7 RR from transaction #2, and paid $0.98 OOP.  Received a $4 RR.

Transaction #4:  Pain relief cream $7.  Used $4 RR from transaction #3, and paid $3 OOP.  Received a $7 RR.

Transaction #5:  Melatonin $4, digestive aid $3.98.  Used $7 RR from transaction #4, paid $0.98 OOP, received $4 RR which I will use for next time.

Total Value:  $33.96

Total OOP:  $11.96

RR to use next time:  $4

  • Walgreens does not limit the number of transactions you do.  They do prefer that if you have more than 1 or 2 transactions, that you use their cosmetics counter to check out.

Walgreens is a very complicated store to master.  I recommend you wait until you are fairly comfortable with couponing before trying multiple deals there.  And give yourself a big fat learning curve!

Please feel free to ask questions!

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